Kangen Water

Water is life. 

But, sometimes, it can also be poison. 

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MY STORY

When I first moved to Tampa two years ago, I had knots and pains in my stomach. I thought maybe it was from the stress of having to find a new job and moving across the country, but as time passed, this theory proved otherwise. For months, I got the same strange stomach aches. My and my boyfriend’s dog also got sick. So sick, that the vets told us his kidneys were failing and he probably doesn’t have much longer than a month to live. It wasn’t until then that we discovered why. We were drinking tap water filtered with a Brita pitcher. 

According to the EWG Tap Water Data Base, the tap water in my area has four contaminants above health guidelines including Chromium, Radiological Containments, and Arsenic (basically cancer, cancer, and cancer!) Plus 8 other detected contaminants. 

We then switched over to buying bottled alkaline water. It made us feel better, dog included, but that was also a bust, because bottled water is:

1) full of chemicals that seep from the plastic into the water
2) linked to hormonal issues from the plastic
3) wasteful AF
4) usually FALSEY ADVERTISED as alkaline.

That’s when I decided to stop playing small and make a real investment in our health.

I bought a Kangen Water Machine. Within a month, any minor conditions we had cleared up, the dog made a miraculous recovery, and all of our energy levels skyrocketed. 

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KANGEN WATER

Kangen Water is anti-oxidant rich, alkalized, performance drinking water— a fancy way of saying this water is the best of the best. The drinking water ranges in alkalinity from 8.5, 9, and 9.5 pH. 

We are exposed to a lot of acidic food and water within our fast-paced, grab-and-go society. High levels of acidity in the body is linked to disease and bodily complications. Viruses, cancer, bacteria build up, yeast, and fungus all thrive in acidic, low oxygen environments. In addition, the antioxidant properties of the water helps to neutralize and flush out any toxins in the bloodstream to help promote anti-aging. One cup of Kangen Water has more antioxidants than green tea or a handful of blueberries. In Japanese, Kangen means “return to origin,” or return to optimal health. Drinking the water revitalizes and hydrates cells in ways that tap and bottled water cannot. 

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THE MACHINE

The machine is the only Medical Grade Alkalizer/Ionizer on the market and can be found in some of Japan’s largest hospitals.  It produces 7 different types of water from 2.5pH to 11.5pH. The machine promotes sustainability and a chemical-free lifestyle as the different types of water can substitute common household items. I now have the ability to stream water for mouthwash, facial toner, pesticide cleaner, laundry detergent, glass cleaner, disinfectant, etc. straight from my kitchen. Recap: This means I don’t have to purchase these products at the store. I can save money and I can sleep better knowing I’m no longer contributing to all of single-use plastic bottles that contaminate our lands and float in around in our oceans.

HOW IT WORKS

The Kangen Machine hooks right up to my kitchen sink. The water flows from the tap, through the filter then across titanium and platinum plates to alkalize and ionize the water and right into my cup.

More here:

 

CHANGE YOUR WATER, CHANGE YOUR LIFE 

Hundreds of thousands of people including Jillian Michaels, Tom Brady, Donald Trump, Shaquille O’Neal, Leonardo DiCaprio, Jennifer Lopez, Bill Gates, Jennifer Lopez, and Brad Pit have all made the change.

Will you?

For questions or more information on how to purchase the Kangen Machine, fill out the short form below.

 

XX,

Mary

Stop Spinning: Get Grounded

When we’re too action oriented, we tend to get stuck in the mind. We get so wrapped up in our to-do lists and all of the other things going on inside of our heads, that we lose sight of what’s important. When we live in a state of mental stress, the body goes into fight or flight mode, which then kicks the nervous system into overdrive. And if this state persists for a prolonged period of time, physical conditions may arise— breakouts, anxiety, hair loss, depression, etc.

And here’s the kicker about living in a state of mental stress: you thought your way there, but there’s no thinking your way out. When life has you spinning, the best thing you can do for yourself is to get grounded; to return awareness to the physical body.

Put your feet on the Earth.

THE CURE

  1. Get your feet on the Earth. Your bare naked feet. This practice is known as “Earthing,” and before you write if off as hippy-dippy, there is science to back it up. The Journal of Environmental Public Health says:

    “It is an established, though not widely appreciated fact, that the Earth’s surface possesses a limitless and continuously renewed supply of free or mobile electrons. The Earth’s negative charges can create a stable internal bioelectrical environment for the normal functioning of all body systems which may be important for setting the biological clock, regulating circadian rhythms, and balancing cortisol levels.”

    2. Tune into your 5 senses. Look around. What do you see? Now, tune into sound. What do you hear? Bring your awareness to your whole body. What do you feel? What are you smelling? What are you tasting? By tuning into your 5 senses, you are bringing awareness back to what is happening in the present moment. This is a powerful practice that takes less than 2 minutes and can be done anywhere at anytime.

    3. Hold onto an object from the Earth. A seashell, a rock, your favorite crystal. Look at it in your hands and simply observe yourself holding the object. Feel its weight, flip it over in your hands, touch its surface. Tangible practices get you out of the mind, because when you’re feeling, you’re not thinking anymore.

    4. Breathe Deeply.  The body is so intelligent that it sustains the flow of breath all day long without conscious awareness. But, by tuning into the breath, you can use it as a tool for release, purification, increasing energy, and coming back to the present moment. Begin with three deep inhales and exhales and continue for as long as you need.

    5. Sit in stillness (advanced). If you haven’t stopped moving in a while, you’ll find that this practice gets uncomfortable quickly. Do what you can to take a step back and observe the inner chatter of the mind without judgement. If you find yourself getting frustrated, don’t stop, remain seated and allow all of that mental “noise” to surface and move out. Eventually your mind will tire as you let all of the stories, and things to do. Tip: Breathing through it will help with purifying the mind.

Sometimes all we need is 5 minutes of grounding to regain balance between the mind, body, and spirit. Other times, we need an entire day to recharge and rebalance. These practices are meant to be done for as long as you need. If a practice doesn’t help you in 5 minutes, consider giving yourself 5 more, and then maybe 5 more after that.

Happy grounding!

Namaste,

Mary

The Return

I felt like a fraud. Inauthentic. Fake. I was lying to everyone— my friends, my family, my entire social media following. But even worse than all of that, I was lying to myself. I was preaching about love and union and oneness, yet I felt so separate. So isolated. So alone.

I was depressed and afraid to admit it. What if I told my friends and family and they didn’t take me seriously? What if they dismissed my illness because of its deceptive invisibility? What if they discredited me as a yoga teacher? What if this feeling never went away?

For two months, I wouldn’t acknowledge those questions. I refused to give them any sort of attention. Until, I went to a psychic who told me I had an aura of sadness surrounding me. Yes, I paid someone to tell me how I’ve been feeling lately: depleted, drained, unhappy. But, to be honest, I wasn’t expecting to hear the truth. I had gone to her as an escape, a desperate final attempt to prove to myself that I was okay (even though I totally wasn’t). The last palm reading I had, about a year ago, I was told that I am a world traveler and I will always have safe comings and goings and that I was about to embark on a chapter of self love and discovery, so I thought that this visit would elicit the same kind of feel good, sunshine-and-rainbow type of fortune. But, that was not the case. Instead, I was left to face the undeniable truth. My depression was real.

And when I did, I felt temporarily relieved. It felt good to talk about it, to free the words that I had encaged within for so long. But then I got caught up in the label of depression and felt worse. Every few days I would feel better until inevitability something would cause me to retreat back into myself. Eventually, this irregular emotional confusion changed form to a vicious cycle of hopelessness and despair. I felt sorry for myself, which made me feel sorry that I even felt sorry for myself in the first place considering how good I have it in comparison to the rest of the world. And then, I would go back to feeling sorry for myself anyway because the pain was so real. I even began to indulge in it, suffering for the sake of suffering. Somewhere in the middle of it all, I began to identify with my deep despondency, as if my depression and I made some sort of arrangement to keep my painful memories alive and to only focus on the sour parts of my life. I completely lost myself. I was saying things I didn’t believe in, throwing myself daily pity parties, and self-sabotaging to another degree.

Even though I was barely recognizable to myself, there was a part of me that was still paying attention, that cared to take note of all of the things that helped and didn’t help. I learned that listening to sad songs, and pitying myself, and oversleeping and believing that I wasn’t good enough, hurt. While being patient with myself, practicing yoga, doing intense physical exercise, writing, believing I was good enough, and reaching out to to people, helped. Especially that last one. (Let’s read it again: reaching out to people helped). While I was unaccepting of feeling most of the love I received, it’s the support from others that really helped me recover. My family and friends offered all that they could from their level of understanding, and my boyfriend helped me flee a toxic situation. I was not alone, after all.

It’s been about a month since I’ve felt really low. I still have good moments and not so good moments, but for the most part, I feel that my energy has returned. I’m sleeping regularly and laughing more. In the last few weeks, I made the move to sunny Florida with my boyfriend and even though I am starting anew without much direction, I am optimistic.

As I begin this new chapter of my life, I am grateful for all that has transpired to get me here. The good, the bad, and the ugly. It was all a part of the process. We endure difficulties in order to experience growth. It’s just one of life’s overwhelmingly complex laws, confusing and incredible at the same time. I could spend years pondering the concept, but I don’t think I will. All I know is I am alive. And that is enough.

It should be noted that no two people are ever going to recover the same. Healing is a very personal process. What works for one, may not work for another. So, while I did not participate in therapy or the use of prescription drugs, does not mean that I do not discredit them. It simply means it was not a part of my process.

If you ever feel depressed, know that you are not alone. Reach out to friends, family, or helplines. To connect with the Depression Helpline, call 1-800-826-3632. For more information, visit www.dbsalliance.org.

Namaste,

Mary

XX

Have a bad ass 2017

You can continue to have the same boring list of resolutions you’ve had for the past 5 + years (eat heathier, exercise more, blah blah blah) or you can get real. Below is a list of attainable and slightly unconventional resolutions to have a bad ass 2017:

Make more mistakes 

Yes, for real. A lot of resolutions have a base in striving for perfection. People want to lose weight to attain the “perfect body,” be a better partner to cultivate the “perfect relationship,” and ultimately create the “perfect life.” But, the truth is, there is nothing human about perfection. Let yourself make mistakes, little ones and big ones. Take action in spite of fear because some of the most valuable life lessons come from screwing up. Put yourself out there. Mistakes are essential to personal growth.

Drop expectations

Expectations tend to cloud our perception of reality. Expectations say “this is how things should be” and when you view your life through the lens of expectation you will never be satisfied in the present moment. Let things be as they are. You may not be able to control the situation, but you can always control your attitude.

Climb that mountain

If there is something you really want to do, then do it. Because really the only other alternative is not doing it. Just remember to be bold, stay focused, and take the next best step. You’ll reach the top whenever you’re meant to get there.

Reinvent yourself often

You reserve the right to be whoever you want, whenever you want. If at some point this year, you wake up with some burning desire to learn Portuguese or move to Australia to become a professional bungee jumper, don’t ignore it. Make it happen. Everything is first born as an idea.

Cultivate an attitude of gratitude

By expressing gratitude, you open yourself up to the powers of positivity. Gratitude brings upon an awareness of all the good in life and eventually, you will begin to see more good without actually looking for it. Choose to practice gratitude however you want. Recite the things you are thankful for while you’re sitting in traffic, or make a mental list before you fall asleep. It doesn’t matter, it’s your practice.

Just be YOU

You’re already a bad ass. You’ve survived 2016 and all of the years before that. Stay true to yourself and your passions and you’re destined to have a kick ass 2017!


Namaste,

Mary

XX

My Journey to the mat

I kind of, sort of fell into yoga by accident.

My yoga journey began last fall when one of my friends was telling me about her gig as the tabata instructor at the campus fitness center. She was explaining to me what the job entailed when I said something that surprised me.

“Yeah, someday I want to be a yoga instructor.”

The words had just flowed right out of my mouth.

You do??? I thought. Since when?

My response had merely been a reflex. I wasn’t even thinking when it happened. Something had just compelled me to say it. Aside from a few beginner classes in high school, I didn’t have much experience with yoga. Yet, there I was confessing some innate desire to teach it. But I felt like I had put my foot in my mouth. I could feel the blood rushing to my cheeks because I really didn’t know what to say next. I couldn’t offer anything else to the conversation, so I quickly changed the subject and silently challenged myself to go to a class soon.

A few weeks passed and I hadn’t forgotten entirely about the whole ordeal, but I hadn’t quite pursued it either. Until, my friend, Emily, asked if my roommates and I were interested in going to Yoga In The Park, a free weekly series offered by one of the local studios. With finals looming, we needed a distraction from studying so we agreed to go. I didn’t even have a mat, just a beach towel, but in the soft grass, it was enough. It was a slow practice that matched the pace of the setting sun. I left feeling light and rejuvenated.

When I returned home for winter break, I vowed to dedicate my time off to doing yoga. My best friend, Jena, and I found a local studio that offered student discounts. Both of us were unfamiliar with the different styles of yoga so we blindly wandered into a hot power flow class. It was a disaster from the start. We exchanged confused glances when we realized the instructor was not there to demonstrate the moves for us. And we grew even more confused when she started using the Sanskrit terms in her monologue. I spent the entire 75 minutes wishing for it to be over. I felt woozy from the heat and weak from holding myself up.  After that first class, Jena and I rolled up our mats and walked to the car in silence. Once both of the vehicle doors were closed, she looked at me and in full seriousness said, “I will NEVER do that again.” I immediately burst into laughter.

Despite her claim, we decided to give it another go. It still sucked. But around my fourth or fifth class, something happened. My body was stronger — I could move through chaturanga without collapsing! And, I didn’t feel the need to succumb to childs pose so often. I was finally able to focus on the act of doing yoga, rather than the pain or the passing time. I was really starting to enjoy it.

When I arrived back to Tampa for my second semester, I was determined to keep up with my practice. As fate would have it, there was a lovely studio in walking distance from my dorm. I committed myself to a three-month unlimited package and went as often as I could. Sometimes twice a day.  Eventually, it became a part of my routine. Now, yoga is so deeply integrated into my daily life that it is a part of who I am. It’s like yoga is embedded into my DNA. Corny, but true.

I can’t go a day without stretching my body or mind in some capacity. I can’t eat certain foods without noticing the effects they have on my body. And, I can’t even go to sleep without first expressing gratitude.

Yoga has brought upon a sense of awareness that I didn’t have prior to starting my practice. From being more mindful, I started to see patterns in my life. I noticed there was a direct correlation between my attitude and how I perceived certain experiences. I learned there is beauty in letting go and there is power in positivity. Simply put, yoga changed the way that I live and I am beyond grateful for that.

Namaste,

Mary

XX.